Aimee Byrd

Inside the word. Outside the box.

Andy Naselli wrote a lengthy review posted on the CBMW website the day before the release of my book, Recovering From Biblical Manhood and Womanhood. I’m not surprised to see a negative review of my book on the Council for Biblical Manhood and Womanhood since I heavily critique their movement in my book. And, given the vitriol I have experienced from some, this review—though hard-hitting—is a welcome, respectful engagement. It is my desire to have profitable discussions on this important matter.

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Don’t you love it when you hear a sermon, a very good sermon, and it overflows with fruitfulness as you find all kinds of intertextual references connecting to your own private Scripture reading? That happened to me today, as my pastor preached on John 20 and the resurrection of Christ. I saw the Song of Songs everywhere, as well as Revelation connections. This is all fitting, as I have been already looking into John’s use of the Song. My mind was reeling, so I wrote a bit of a stream of conscious style piece while cooking my Easter feast (which makes me want to include the feasting language in the Song associated with the presence of the Groom, but enough Aimee!)

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I have been doing a lot of reading over here and very little posting. I’m currently enjoying a lot of research on a new project I am working on, which has taken me from writing much on the blog. But I wanted to share some quick blurbs on some notable books I’ve been reading on the side. After all, with most of us social distancing, reading may be making a comeback! I wish I was smart enough to figure out how to add the cover designs in a way that’s pleasing to the eye on this new webpage system, but I did provide the links. 

Our Bodies Tell God’s Story, by Christopher West 

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That’s supposedly me. I read that about myself yesterday. Just a couple of hours after reading an OPC pastor in my own denomination telling others on Facebook to call my church to put a stop to me. Then he gave my church’s information, showing a picture of my pastor.

Not a daughter of Sarah. Because I resent God’s created order and hate him for not letting me teach. That’s what I read. Is that me?

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I stumbled upon something Gregory the Great wrote warning how vices often masquerade as virtues.* It made me pause and reflect. Here are some of his words:

Often, for instance, a niggard passes himself off as frugal, while one who is prodigal conceals his character when he calls himself openhanded. Often, inordinate laxity is believed to be kindness, and unbridled anger passes as the virtue of spiritual zeal. Precipitancy is frequently taken as efficient promptitude, and dilatoriness as grave deliberation.

Ok, yes, this language is a little outdated. And the first vice he names sounds awfully close to a racial slur, which it is not to be clear. In modern terms:

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Over the Christmas and New Year holiday, I treated myself to read Volume II of Amy Mantravadi’s Chronicles of Maud series, The Forsaken Monarch. At first, I couldn’t decide whether to read it on Kindle or in print, as I didn’t know if I could comfortably hold a 657-page book the way you’d want to curl up and read a novel. I’m glad I went with the print version, as the book had just the right dimensions for holding well, didn’t have too stiff a spine to be able to keep it open to my page, and the font size was large enough to lend to the page-turner excitement that this historical fiction offered.

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Benjamin Gladd excels in taking big theological ideas and presenting them in succinct, digestible, and teachable ways. He helps turn academics into real life questions with personal significance. And in his latest book, From Adam and Israel to the Church: A Biblical Theology of the People of God, he wants to talk about the great value in which each person is created to bear the image of God as a prophet, priest, and king in his family. From the start Gladd explains that his purpose in writing is “not polemical. My main concern in this project is to examine the nature of the people of God from Genesis to Revelation through the lens of being in God’s ‘image.’” What does it mean to be a part of God’s family? 

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